Week 13: July 30, 2014

In this week’s box:

2 pints blueberries

2 half-pints raspberries

1 flat peaches

1 dozen eggs

2 ambrosia cantaloupe

3 watermelons

1 bushel sweet corn

1 bag tomatoes

4 half-pints OPTIONAL BONUS pick-your-own raspberries, 8 a.m. until noon on Wednesday, July 30

4 half-pints OPTIONAL BONUS pick-your-own raspberries, 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 3

Pick-your-own opportunities for CSA members only.

Total retail value of goods in this week’s box: $119

Total retail value of goods distributed so far this year: $1,001

Emily’s notes:

Have you been throwing away your peach pits? Did you know that in the center of the pits are small, almond-like nuts referred to by the French as noyaux? These nuts, and even the stony pit that surrounds them, can in fact be used to infuse custards, liquors, vinegars and lots of other things. I recommend this post from the blog BraveTart for starters. It also discusses the rumors that eating peach pits will poison you. Also, take a look at these recipes from Bon Appetit for using all kinds of stone fruit pits. One more way to get more from your CSA! 

Speaking of using the whole fruit, our region’s very own Doctor Yum has a super-simple recipe for making whole-fruit popsicles that would work perfectly with this week’s box. Get yourself some popsicle molds and lightly place some sliced peaches, blueberries and raspberries into the empty molds. Puree some watermelon, or even a mixture of watermelon and cantaloupe, or any of the other fruits you’ve got this week, in a blender and pour the liquid mixture over the fruit in the molds. Freeze until solid and you’ll have a healthy treat come dessert time. Click here for a cute video demonstrating the method.

If you’re like me, you turn again and again to the same flavor profile when serving summer favorites like corn and tomatoes. For me, that’s a Mediterranean blend of salt, pepper, lemon, olive oil and maybe feta or Parmesan. If you’re looking to travel to a new region with your cuisine, try this recipe from Serious Eats for corn and tomato curry. I love the simplicity of it.

If you’ve frozen enough corn kernels or cobs, why not freeze some corn in muffin form? Then all fall and winter you’ll be able to go to the freezer for a homemade baked good to accompany stews and chilis. I usually just add a bunch of corn kernels to the corn muffin recipe you find on the back of your bag of cornmeal. However, here is a Dorie Greenspan recipe for “Corniest Corn Muffins,” adapted by Smitten Kitchen.

 

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