Week 6: June 11, 2014

In this week’s box:

2 heads cabbage

2 heads broccoli

2 bags yellow squash

1 bag zucchini

2 bags string beans

2 pints blueberries

1 dozen eggs

7 pints snow peas

6 pints sugar snap peas

Total retail value of goods in this week’s box: $68

Total retail value of goods distributed so far this year: $417

Emily’s notes:

Welcome to summer! The season itself is still a couple weeks off, but this box has summer written all over it. Enjoy the sugar snaps this week, because this is probably the last we will see of them until next spring. As for snow peas, they’re great in stir-fries. You can find more ideas for snow peas in this post from last year’s CSA blog. I also used snow peas earlier this season in a Thai-style salmon recipe I found in Dinner: A Love Story, one of the few cookbooks I have left in my collection after years of trying to winnow it down. This recipe is versatile, and could use a handful or two of any of the vegetables in this week’s box. For squash, I would probably cut them into matchsticks to use them here. Here’s my very slightly adapted version:

Thai-ish Salmon

recipe from Dinner: A Love Story

2 tablespoons canola oil

2 salmon fillets of just under 1 pound each

1 tablespoon finely minced fresh lemongrass (the white part of the stalk), which you can find in the fresh herbs section at Wegmans and other local stores

1 tablespoon chopped scallions (white and green parts)

2/3 cup light coconut milk

juice of one lime

1.5 teaspoons Thai red curry paste

handful cilantro, chopped

handful basil, chopped

1 good handful snow peas, de-stringed

1 good handful broccoli, cut into bite-sized pieces

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil.

Place salmon in skillet flesh-side down and cook 3 or 4 minutes, until browned. Set aside.

Reduce heat to medium-low. Add lemongrass and scallions, stir for 1 minute. Add coconut milk, lime juice and curry paste. Whisk together and let simmer about 3 minutes.

Add salmon back in, skin side down, nestling into the sauce. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes. Add cilantro, basil, snow peas and broccoli.

Simmer another 7-8 minutes. Serve with jasmine rice, more cilantro, scallions and lime wedges.

For a cozy weekend meal, try pairing stuffed cabbage with green beans cooked with bacon. For stuffed cabbage, I’ve had this recipe from the Barefoot Contessa on my to-do list for a while. As for the green beans, I’d start by chopping some raw bacon into small bits and cooking it in a Dutch oven. Remove the bacon when it’s crisp and then put your prepped green beans in the pot. Give them a quick saute in the hot bacon fat, then add water or chicken stock just to cover. Put the lid on and cook until the green beans are the texture you like them, adding more stock if necessary. Serve with the cooked bacon added back in. I’d go easy on the salt with these, because bacon adds a lot of salt, but some red pepper flakes added in with the beans would be nice.

A couple of quick salad ideas that will use some of these vegetables raw. Use your vegetable peeler to slice long, thin slices of zucchini or yellow squash. Place them in a bowl and douse with lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper. Add some pecorino cheese chunks just before serving. Similarly, finely chop green beans, snow peas or sugar snap peas to give them a different texture. Toss with the same ingredients as above and serve nice and cold.

 

 

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Week 9: June 26, 2013

In this week’s box:

3 pounds of green beans

1/2 dozen eggs

3 pounds of potatoes

2 bunches of green onions

2 bunches of beets

2 bunches of swiss chard

14 ears of bicolor corn(white and yellow on the same cob)

1 head of broccoli

1/2 pint of raspberries

1 pint of blackberries

1 bag of tomatoes

Retail value of this week’s box: $46

Total retail value of goods distributed so far this season: $472

Emily’s notes:

vegOn a recent trip to the library, I stumbled upon a cookbook that I think would make a great reference in any CSA member’s kitchen. It’s called, “Eat More Vegetables” by Tricia Cornell, and was published in 2012. Cornell, who lives in Minnesota, is a longtime CSA member. She writes about how the weekly box of produce was overwhelming for her for the first few years of membership, and she even dreaded CSA pickup days at times because of the volume that came into her kitchen. But over the years she developed rhythms and devised dishes that made it all a lot more manageable and enjoyable for her entire family. There are some really creative recipes in here that look like a lot of fun. I think I might have to make an exception to my self-imposed ban on buying new cookbooks to add this one to the home library.

When I picked up this book, I was thinking about beets, which also appear in this week’s box. Cornell’s recipe for Beet and Goat Cheese Tart looked intriguing to me. I’m going to be entertaining guests this week, so I might give it a try. Here it is:

Beet and Goat Cheese Tart

Serves 8 as an appetizer

1 pound beets

1/2 cup plain yogurt

1 egg

6 ounces goat cheese

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed

olive oil

1 to 2 tablespoons honey (optional)

1 teaspoon dried sumac (This is a Middle-Eastern spice that Cornell says is optional, but adds a nice tartness.)

Wrap beets in foil and roast at 400 degrees until a knife slides easily all the way through (This took about an hour with the beets we got last week.). You want beets on the softer rather than firmer side for this recipe. Leave the oven on. Peel the beets under running water as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Slice them 1/4 inch thick.

Mix yogurt, egg and goat cheese. Place pastry on lightly floured or parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush very lightly with olive oil. Cover pastry with overlapping disks of beets, leaving about 1 inch around the edges. Spoon goat cheese mixture over the top, still leaving the edges clear. Drizzle with honey (I am thinking balsamic vinegar might be a good alternative here.) and bake 35 to 40 minutes, until edges are puffed and golden brown. Cool completely, then slice into 2-inch squares and serve.

If you’re looking for more beet ideas, the beet salad described in this post on the blog “Dinner: A Love Story” looks nice to me. I also might have to make this beet hummus that has been on my to-do list for years, but never seems to get made before I use my beets for something else. Like cake.

With onions, green beans and potatoes in this week’s box, you’re all set up to make a classic Southern side, green beans and new potatoes. This recipe from the blog Deep South Dish gives a good guide. I can smell the bacon now.

On a busy night, I sometimes like to roast my green beans. They don’t get as soggy, and the flavors of what you dress them in intensify a bit. The last time we got green beans, I roasted them after tossing them with a mix of sesame oil, soy sauce, rice vinegar and brown sugar, with a sprinkling of sesame seeds. This recipe for parmesan roasted green beans from the blog Skinny Taste looks like something I’ll have to try with this batch.

And the first corn of the season is here! Last year I discovered that the best way to get corn on the table quickly on a weeknight was to toss it in the microwave, husk and all, and cook for about 3 minutes per ear (exact time will vary based on your microwave’s power). Remove it with a potholder (It’s hot!) and hack off the end that was attached to the stalk. Then you should be able to shake the cooked ear of corn straight onto your plate without having to deal with those pesky silks. It’s not quite as good as roasting corn in an oven (also with husks on) or grilling it, but it’s pretty good for a quick weeknight technique, which is what I need most of the time these days.

You could combine fresh corn taken off the cob with chopped tomates and onions from this week’s box for a quick fresh salsa. Toss the mixture with a little olive oil, lemon or lime juice, salt, pepper and cilantro (if you like it). Dice some of the potatoes and serve them hash-brown style, and scramble a few of the eggs. Spoon your salsa over the potatoes and eggs and you have a really tasty dinner completely from your CSA box!

You can click the “Swiss Chard” tag at right to see all the recipes we’ve linked to for chard so far this year. I am thinking of using my pizza dough recipe to make a chard calzone this week. I’ll share the recipe if it turns out!

This far into the season, I’d love to hear your thoughts on this blog. Are the recipes useful? Do they fit your lifestyle? Are there vegetables that you need more ideas for? Please e-mail me here with your comments (I will specify that I am asking for comments about the blog itself. Questions about CSA pickup should be directed to the Sneads.)